COMPARATIVE STUDIES of SOUTH ASIA, AFRICA and the MIDDLE EAST (CSSAAME)

Volume 24 | No. 2 | 2004


Table of Contents

Contentions


Mahgoub El-Tigani Mahmoud: Inside Darfur: Ethnic Genocide by a Governance Crisis

Forms of Knowledge in Early Modern South Asia Guest Edited by Sheldon Pollock


Sheldon Pollock: Introduction
Sumit Guha: Transitions and Translations: Regional Power and Vernacular Identity in the Dakhan c.1500-1800
Imre Bangha: Dynamics of Textual Transmission in Premodern India: The Kavit�val� of Tuls� D�s
Allison Busch: The Anxiety of Literary Innovation: The Practice of Literary Science in Hindi/Riti Tradition
Muzaffar Alam and Sanjay Subrahmanyam: The Making of a Munshi
Sunil Sharma: The City of Beauties in the Indo-Persian Poetic Landscape
Janet Gyatso: The Authority of Empiricism and the Empiricism of Authority: Medicine and Buddhism in Tibet on the Eve of Modernity

German Orientalism Guest Edited by Jennifer Jenkins


Jennifer Jenkins: German Orientalism: Its Histories and Legacies
Susan R. Boettcher:Lutheran Sermons on the Turk: Jacob Andreae's Message on the Turks after Szeged (1568)
Tuska Benes: Comparative Linguistics as Ethnology: In Search of Indo-Germans in Central Asia, 1770-1830
Nina Berman: Buber versus Herzl: Zionism as Orientalism
Gottfried Hagen: German Heralds of Holy War: A Case Study in Applied Orientalism
Eugene Sensenig-Dabbous: Will the Real Almasy Please Stand Up! Transporting Central European Orientalism via The English Patient

Notes on Contributors


Muzaffar Alam is Professor in the Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Chicago. Earlier he taught for over twenty-five years at the Jawaharlal Nehru University (New Delhi). He has authored The Crisis of Empire in Mughal North India, 1707�1748 (1986), and The Languages of Political Islam: India, 1200�1800 (2004), as well as co-edited The Mughal State (1998) with Sanjay Subrahmanyam.
Tuska Benes received a BA in History from Wellesley College in 1993 and a PhD in History from the University of Washington in 2001. She is currently Assistant Professor of History at the College of William and Mary.
Nina Berman is Associate Professor of Comparative Studies and German Studies at The Ohio State University. She is the author of Impossible Missions? German Economic, Military, and Humanitarian Efforts in Africa (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2004) and Orientalismus, Kolonialismus und Moderne: Zum Bild des Orients in der deutschsprachigen Kultur um 1900 (Stuttgart: Metzler, 1997). She is currently working on a study entitled �Germany and the Middle East: A Cultural History, 900�2000.�
Susan R. Boettcher is assistant professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin. Her ongoing research concerns the cultural constitution of early Lutheranism through theology, popular literature, preaching, memory, and polemic. She is currently completing a book manuscript on commemoration of Luther and Lutheran memory, 1546-1580.
Allison Busch is assistant professor of Hindi-Urdu language and literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She holds a PhD in South Asian Languages and Civilizations from the University of Chicago. Her research centers on courtly literature and intellectual history in early-modern north India. She is currently working on a book provisionally entitled �The Courtly Vernacular: Hindi Literary Culture from Mughal to Colonial Times.�
Gottfried Hagen graduated from Heidelberg University with an MA in Islamic Studies, Semitic Languages, and Medieval and Modern History in 1989 and obtained his PhD in Turkish Studies from Free University of Berlin in 1996. Since 2000 he has been Assistant Professor of Turkish Studies at the University of Michigan. He has worked extensively on Ottoman intellectual and religious history, including questions of cultural transfer and mutual perception between Europe and the Ottoman Empire. His books include Die T�rkei im Ersten Weltkrieg. Flugbl�tter und Flugschriften in arabischer, persischer und osmanisch-t�rkischer Sprache eingeleitet, �bersetzt und kommentiert (Frankfurt: P. Lang, 1990), and Ein osmanischer Geograph bei der Arbeit. Entstehung und Gedankenwelt von Katib �elebis Gihannn�ma (Berlin: Klaus Schwarz Verlag, 2003).
Jennifer Jenkins is Associate Professor of German and European History in the Department of History at the University of Toronto, where she holds a Canada Research Chair in Modern German History. She is the author of Provincial Modernity: Local Culture and Liberal Politics in Fin-de-Siecle Hamburg (Cornell University Press, 2003), an exploration of the dynamics of nationalism, modernity, and public culture in Imperial Germany. She is currently working on a book on the relationship between Germany and Iran after 1890.
Sanjay Subrahmanyam is Professor of Indian History and Culture at the University of Oxford. He has taught at Delhi and Paris, as well as Lisbon, Philadelphia, and Minneapolis. His books include The Political Economy of Commerce (1990), The Career and Legend of Vasco da Gama (1997), Penumbral Visions (2001), and Mughals and Franks (2004).Jennifer Jenkins is Associate Professor of German and European History in the Department of History at the University of Toronto, where she holds a Canada Research Chair in Modern German History. She is the author of Provincial Modernity: Local Culture and Liberal Politics in Fin-de-Siecle Hamburg (Cornell University Press, 2003), an exploration of the dynamics of nationalism, modernity, and public culture in Imperial Germany. She is currently working on a book on the relationship between Germany and Iran after 1890.